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Milk Carton Murders 37

Sunday, July 20, 2014 / 17 Comments
My vision of Lamont, the town of The Milk Carton Murders
(Photo is really Bastrop, TX, although my book is set in western NY State.)



SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old remains washed up in coffins at Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid who he knew as Sally, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. Last time Pepper tells Dave of the stuffed dog found in the coffin with Samantha. Turns out Dave had given it to her before she disappeared. We pick up a little bit ahead in the same scene. Pepper speaks first.

And now the snippet:

“Samantha put something inside the stuffed dog at some point, between the back stitches—a piece of balsa wood. We figure it survived because it was surrounded by fiber fill, basically encased in plastic.”

“Balsa wood? That’s what my pine wood derby car was made out of.”

“And when did you make that?”

“It was pretty soon after she came to us—May or June, but why do that?"

Pepper looked him straight in the eye, “Because it was a soft wood to carve into I imagine. She wanted to leave us a message, Dave; for the person she hoped someday would find her.”

###

I wonder what it said? Don't you hate that?

***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!
*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.
 

***   

Freedom To Read

Wednesday, July 02, 2014 / 18 Comments
Three winners will be chosen to receive an ebook 
(your choice of format MOBI or EPUB) of
Bread & Butter 
The Murders of Polly Frisch

A 19th century true crime by Cindy Amrhein (me) and Ellen Bachorski


In 1856, in the rural town of Alabama, NY one woman's family suffered from multiple unexplained deaths. The town folk grew suspicious of the now remarried Polly Frisch. An investigation commenced, bodies were exhumed, an affair—exposed. Polly would be arrested for the murders of her first husband and daughters. Her fourteen-year-old son would testify against her. If found guilty, the punishment for such a crime was the gallows. Would Polly be the first woman in Genesee County history to be hanged for murder? Bread & Butter is the true story of Polly Frisch who poisoned her family with arsenic and the five trials it took to convict her.


All you have to do is leave a comment below, the rest is optional for extra entries. Good luck!
Don't forget to hop around to he other blogs below to  enter other giveaways.



a Rafflecopter giveaway

Inspirational writing tools.

Sunday, June 29, 2014 / No Comments

Now tell me, what writer doesn't still like a classic now and then?

So last week at a flee market I spotted a vintage 1930s (my guess) typewriter for $55. So this week we went back to get it. They also had a six speed Greco swing for $10. I bargained and got both for $60. Can't believe the manual was underneath the typewriter, copyright 1934-38, and it has a key. I can lock it like my iPad! HA ! I know yuz writers is jealous!

It is a small portable in beautiful condition. It still has the typewriter brush with it too. No bent keys as the, "Quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog," has proved. The ribbon even had a little life in it, but I shall have to check around for ribbons, which won't be hard. This is one gadget that has stood the test of time. I'm going to take it to my favorite spot at Silver Lake and write. I think I may have to cut my fingernails ...


Speaking of new gadgets, I'm trying to get the Amazon carousel thing to book to display books. I can see it when on my laptop but not on my iPad? Think it's an Apple not wanting to display Amazon things issue? I'm going to try it below and see if it works in a post. If you don't see it, I guess it will answer that question.


Blogsite Malfunction

Sunday, June 22, 2014 / 2 Comments
Before you say it, yes I backed up my template as well as all my posts. In my attempt to try and find a new template and not finding one right away, my old template for some reason, would not re-upload. I like the new one BUT none of my posts are showing soooo, 8 sentence snippet for me today.

Milk Carton Murders 36

Sunday, June 15, 2014 / 19 Comments

Time for another snippet from:

SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old remains washed up in coffins at Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid who he knew as Sally, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. This week Pepper needs to ask our reporter, Dave, some questions. She is sharing a bit of what the forensic's team found inside one of the coffins with him to see what he says. 

As always the words in italics is the "other" voice in Dave's head.

And now the snippet (Pepper speaks first):

Well your Sally, a.k.a. our victim Samantha Briggs, had a stuffed dog, more teddy bear style construction made of polyester, a man made fabric that’s plastic based, which is why it survived.”

 “Was it yellow?”

“Yes, extremely dirty, but it was yellow. And you knew this how?”

Dave slumped against the jeep; please, he thought, no more headaches—focus. “Because I gave it to her—I think I won it at the county fair.”

You think? Oh come on Davy, quit being a chicken shit, you can remember—or do I have to tell you?    
***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!
*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.
 

***   

 ***
  If you're curious what Polly Frisch is doing, you can find her on Amazon in paperback and for Kindle, Smashwords, and for Nook, and on iTunes. She did good in the Goodreads giveaway with 940 entries.

 You can download a free excerpt (about 3 chapters) on NoiseTrade Books in mobi , ePub or PDF formats.  NoiseTrade has been for music since 2008 and just stepped into the literary side. Lots of things to read for free in exchange for an email addy and zip code. A great way for authors to inform their readers of what they're up too, or if they're in their area for a signing.


Milk Carton Murders 35

Sunday, June 08, 2014 / 10 Comments

Time for another snippet from:

SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old remains washed up in coffins at Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. His dad Hal is one of the suspects. Dave and Investigator Pepper Black are at the police station going through boxes Dave pulled from their attic. One is a box of old foster family files (that Dave's dad believes will help clear him) and a couple boxes of old photographs from the right time period and before. Pepper and Dave come across two, group shots form a "Farm Days" event for foster kids that have the three victims in them.

Now the snippet:
"All the kids were taken on a tour," said Dave. "They got to pet and feed the cows. The Donley’s even had an old cow that was pretty people friendly, meaning it wouldn’t start crapping all over the place when it was around screaming kids.  Cows tend to do that when they sense you’re nervous, then it makes them nervous and they shit all over.”

“So this photograph is obviously 1987,” Pepper said making mental notes, “between July and September. I’m going to make a photocopy of it; then I want you to write on the copy and tell who’s who, as much as you can remember anyway.”

***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!
*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.
 

***  
You still have time to enter and win one of five autographed copies of 

Bread & Butter the Murders of Polly Frisch

By Cindy Amrhein & Ellen Lea Bachorski

SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old remains washed up in coffins at Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. His dad Hal is one of the suspects. Dave and Investigator Pepper Black are at the police station going through boxes Dave pulled from their attic. One is a box of old foster family files (that Dave's dad believes will help clear him) and a couple boxes of old photographs from the right time period and before. Dave's dad, Hal, also worked in the print shop at the dairy. - See more at: http://historysleuth.blogspot.com/#sthash.2Bl90jT4.dpuf


Goodreads Book Giveaway

Bread & Butter The Murders of Polly Frisch by Cindy Amrhein & Ellen Lea Bachorski
Enter to win

IWSG Post - Juggling Life

Wednesday, June 04, 2014 / 4 Comments

Oh for pitty sake! It's the first Wednesday of the month! 

Time for...

***
Bread and Butter The Murders of Polly Frisch is now available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle editions.
The list to the other IWSG bloggers is here.
If your user name in comments doesn't lead to your IWSG blog, leave the URL so I can find you!
 
Here's how to do a clickable link to your blog in comments:
< a href="http://historysleuth.blogspot.com/">History Sleuth's Writings</a >
Just replace my stuff with yours and take the space out between the < a and a >
(Had to put a space in or you would see a link instead of code. :)
Keep it in a note on your desktop so you can copy & keep hitting paste at every blog instead of retyping.
- See more at: http://historysleuth.blogspot.com/2014/05/iswg-post-tweaking-of-ebooks.html#sthash.5OEaGFH4.dpuf
Today I came home from work and I thought, Lord, my house looks like a bomb went off in it. Well, maybe not that bad, but bad enough. How do all of you juggle life with writing? It seems like life gets in the way of LIFE

Maybe I need a Stepford wife.

Ok, maybe not her...
....but one that does all those mundane tasks so I have time to sit down and write, edit whatever. Spend time with hubby, my kids, my grand kids. Feel fulfilled as a mom/grandma/wife AND a writer. Oh, yes and go to work. 

Maybe something like...


I wonder if I can find one on eBay?
Actually I bet Craigslist has them. All the weird shit is on Craigslist.

In the meantime, Bread & Butter the Murders of Polly Frisch is doing pretty good out there in cyberspace. I have more to publish as soon as I find time to compile and format it. Well it's off to clean the kitchen.... I think it's the kitchen. I remember there being a room if I turn left through the one archway, ya, I think it's that way...

The list to the other IWSG bloggers is here.
If your user name in comments doesn't lead to your IWSG blog, leave the URL so I can find you!
 
Here's how to do a clickable link to your blog in comments:
< a href="http://historysleuth.blogspot.com/">History Sleuth's Writings</a >
Just replace my stuff with yours and take the space out between the < a and a >
(Had to put a space in or you would see a link instead of code. :)
Keep it in a note on your desktop so you can copy & keep hitting paste at every blog instead of retyping.


***
Bread and Butter The Murders of Polly Frisch is now available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle editions.
The list to the other IWSG bloggers is here.
If your user name in comments doesn't lead to your IWSG blog, leave the URL so I can find you!
 
Here's how to do a clickable link to your blog in comments:
< a href="http://historysleuth.blogspot.com/">History Sleuth's Writings</a >
Just replace my stuff with yours and take the space out between the < a and a >
(Had to put a space in or you would see a link instead of code. :)
Keep it in a note on your desktop so you can copy & keep hitting paste at every blog instead of retyping.
- See more at: http://historysleuth.blogspot.com/2014/05/iswg-post-tweaking-of-ebooks.html#sthash.5OEaGFH4.dpuf

Paying it Forward

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 / 5 Comments
I was recently tagged by Chip Etier, a writer of some awesome political thrillers, to participate in a Paying it Forward blog hop. Thanks Chip for thinking of me and my other tagged fellow writers, Teresa Cypher and Jess Schira. Chip blogs often for Venture Galleries, a site that connects readers, writers and books. What author could resit the opportunity? So thanks to them too.

We have to answer four questions. About what you wonder? Well writing of course. For people who are used to using our words in a thousand different descriptive ways, I think we sometimes have trouble talking about ourselves. It's a great exercise in looking at ourselves and why we do what we do despite the never ending challenge of it. So here we go ......

1. What am I working on? 

I'm doing three different things at once, all in different stages of production. I think a lot of writers do that. The first full length piece I ever wrote was a book with my friend Ellen Bachorski called Bread & Butter the Murders of Polly Frisch. That was back in 2000, when self-publishing was nothing like it is today. We've sold the 1st edition right along. Recently we brought Polly into the new world of self-publishing. It is a fascinating story about a woman in the 1850s who poisoned her husband and two of her children with arsenic, and the five trials it took to convict her. It was a challenge to teach myself how to make ebooks.

 The second thing is a book on Indian land title in New York State. This at the moment is with an editor of a commercial publisher. I wrote for 2 1/2 years for a Native American newspaper called the Akwesasne Phoenix Sundays. My column was on history and land rights issues. I expanded upon it and put it in book form.

The third, a mystery. I love murder mysteries so I thought I'd try it. I write historical true crime often so I thought, how much fun it would be to do my own murder? I find it a breath of fresh air from doing non-fiction. This one is called The Milk Carton Murders, set in a rural area like my own. It is in the editing phase. I'm also writing a NA adventure with elements of history in it now that Polly is out of the creation phase.

2. How does my work differ from others of its genre? 

My work is probably different because the subjects are. All do stem from history in one form or another even the non-fiction.  I have no problem hoping from Native American history, which in my case involves a lot of research in the clerks office looking at deeds; then picking up true crime from a hundred years ago, or setting that down to play in the fiction world of my characters in The Milk Carton Murders.

3. Why do I write what I write?

Being a historian, I can't help it. We do a quarterly at the county historian's office where I work. I love researching and writing about true crimes more than any other topic. It's not the crime itself but the mindset of the killer that fascinates me. I try to incorporate that in my mysteries as well. As for the Native American land issues? Having researched deeds, treaties, etc for so long it disturbs me that the Nations were so cheated out of their land in half ass deals they had no way of fairly defending themselves over. I have discovered new information and ways to look at it through my research and I look forward to sharing that.

4. How does my writing process work?

Even in fiction, a lot of research first. I like things to be accurate and believable---historians like facts. In non-fiction, after I have collected enough information where I feel I have enough I start writing. I'm a pantster, so for fiction, no outline. For true crime, or other history, I then usually put all the events in chronological order, right down to the hour and minute sometimes, especially with crimes. With a real crime there is usually pieces I'm missing that I need to look for to fill in the holes, so then I go through again and fill in the blanks during re-write. Lots of edits and beta readers too of course. Sometimes, especially with non-fiction, it's hard to say, "It's done." New records are uncovered all the time. At some point you have to write -The End-.

And now to pick three other writers. :)

Milk Carton Murders 34

Sunday, May 18, 2014 / 16 Comments
Since Polly Frish is finally off committing murder in the digital world, I thought I would relax with some fiction. Time to get back to....

SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old remains washed up in coffins at Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. His dad Hal is one of the suspects. Dave and Investigator Pepper Black are at the police station going through boxes Dave pulled from their attic. One is a box of old foster family files (that Dave's dad believes will help clear him) and a couple boxes of old photographs from the right time period and before. Dave's dad, Hal, also worked in the print shop at the dairy.

AND NOW THE SNIPPET: 

Pepper picked one up and studied it for a moment. “Shit, all three of the girls are in this one. Where was this taken?”
   
“It was one of the foster family picnics," said Dave. "James Donley’s grandfather, Patrick Donley, was very supportive of the Friends of Foster Families group—donated a lot of money to it in fact—that’s why he jumped on board when the missing children’s milk carton program started. His son Albert was pissed about it—thought it was a waste of space that should have been used for advertising.”

“So how often did these picnics take place?”

“Every year, right at the dairy; all the kids were taken on a tour."


***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.


 ***
  If you're curious what Polly Frisch is doing, you can find her on Amazon in paperback and for Kindle, Smashwords, and for Nook

 You can download a free excerpt (about 3 chapters) on NoiseTrade Books in mobi , ePub or PDF formats.  NoiseTrade has been for music since 2008 and just stepped into the literary side. Lots of things to read for free in exchange for an email addy and zip code. A great way for authors to inform their readers of what the're up too, or if they're in their area for a signing.


Mother's Day Gift

Sunday, May 11, 2014 / 5 Comments
No Weekend Writing Warriors or Snippet Sunday Post for me today. My newest grand baby was born yesterday. We is busy, busy, busy! If I have a chance I will hop around to your blogs to see what your all up to now in your story lines.


Little sister, big sister, and mommy (my daughter).