Milk Carton Murders 43

Welcome to Weekend Writing Warriors. This is a view of Silver Lake, one of the settings in The Milk Carton Murders
SETUP:We are still in the county sheriff's office where Dave is looking at files and photos pulled from his attic kept from when his mother and father were foster parents to several children. Last week Inv. Pepper Black and Dave come across two group photos of the missing girls taken during a Friends of Foster Families picnic at a local farm, from when Dave was a kid. Dave is pointing some people out in the photographs to Pepper.


AND NOW THE SNIPPET: (Pepper speaks first)

“Now why, I wonder, is Lisa or Rachael even in this photograph?”

“I’m not following you.” Dave said.

“Rachael McKenzie would have been four in 1987, but she was abducted from Cuba, NY in 1986. Same thing for Lisa – why is she in this photograph? She would have been three in this photo, but she went missing from Albany, no where near here. Did you look up anything on microfilm for Samantha or Lisa?”

“I tried. I didn’t find anything,” Dave answered. 



***

The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

Milk Carton Murders 42


 Weekend Writing Warriors Snippet time!

SETUP:We are still in the county sheriff's office where Dave is looking at files and photos pulled from his attic kept from when his mother and father were foster parents to several children. Last week Pepper and Dave come across two group photos of the missing girls taken during a Friends of Foster Families picnic at a local farm, from when Dave was a kid. Pepper leaves the room to make a photocopy of the group shots.


AND NOW THE SNIPPET:

Dave continued  his rummage through the box. He was almost done, and still no baby pictures of himself. He pulled out more from over the years that he could match up with the photos from the foster files, a few of Samantha--but none of Lisa and Rachael except for in the two candid group photos from the picnic of 1987.

Pepper came back in the room. “Okay, a copy for you and a copy for me. Now let’s see what we can figure out.” She sat down next to him and put both of the photographs in front of them on the desk above their photocopies.
 

“I recognize Samantha," Dave said, "she’s the girl on the cow."


***

The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

Milk Carton Murders 41


It's Weekend Writing Warriors time! When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.(Photo from collection of the Wyoming County Historian)

SETUP:We are still in the county sheriff's office where Dave is looking at files and photos pulled from his attic kept from when his mother and father were foster parents to several children. Last week Pepper and Dave come across a group photo of the girls from when Dave's was a kid.


AND NOW THE SNIPPET:
Pepper picked it up and studied it for a moment. “Shit, all three of the girls  are in this one. Where was this taken?”
   
“It was one of the foster family picnics," said Dave. James Donley’s grandfather, Patrick Donley, was very supportive of the Friend’s of Foster Families group. He donated a lot of money to it in fact. That’s why he jumped on board when the missing children’s milk carton program started. His son Albert was pissed about it—thought it was a waste of space that should have been used for advertising.”





The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

 AND MY BIG NEWS OF THE WEEK....
If you're connected with me on Facebook or Twitter you already know. :) I signed a contract with The History Press to publish my non-fiction book on Indian land title in New York State. Due out sometime after May in 2015 (based on my deadlines. I'll know when as it gets closer.) Their focus is regional history, so a good choice for this particular book.

Dystopian Thriller Gene Cards

Congrats to my friend Elena Giorgi on the release of her new thriller Gene Cards!


 To celebrate the release you can purchase Gene Cards on Amazon for 99¢ for a limited time. Quick! October 21st is your last day!

Gene Cards is a dystopian, near-future thriller set in the fictional city of Liasis: When the cure for some means death for others, how far will you go to save your own?


Yulia Szymanski is a murderer and one of the best hackers of the century. Her mission: break her brother out of a high security jail before he dies of a rare genetic condition. On her trail is Biothreat Agent Skyler Donohue, a decorated Muay Thai fighter with a strange fascination for corpses. The obstacle to overcome: an invisible, deadly disease that strikes at random and has the city of Liasis locked in a bioterrorism siege.

When the latest to fall ill is Skyler's best friend's daughter, Skyler wants to drop the Szymanski case to chase the baffling pathogen that nobody is able to isolate. What she doesn't know is that finding Yulia is the only way to stop the epidemic and save the child's life.

In a world where identities are based on gene cards, and privacy no longer exists, survival is only granted to the rich, the healthy, and those who've learned to become invisible to the system.

 ***
You can't ask for more in a thriller about genetics than one written by a DNA scientist like Elena. I beta read this story and I have to say, the way it was woven together, it kept me guessing who the real bad guy was in an imperfect world. To tell you who I ultimately routed for would spoil the story. Action packed, yes, but the whole genetics thing really makes one wonder what is possible, it makes for some scary realistic sci-fi.

You can find Elena and her other great stories over at her blog CHIMERAS

Milk Carton Murders 40

Another Weekend Writing Warriors. This photo is one of my inspirations for my Milk Carton Murders World-Silver Lake
SETUP: We are still in the county sheriff's office where Dave is looking at files and photos pulled from his attic kept from when his mother and father were foster parents to several children. Last week Dave answered the voice in his head out loud, and Pepper heard him. The voice pointed out it was weird there were no baby pictures of "Davy," as the voice calls him. What can't Dave remember?


 

AND NOW THE SNIPPET:

She heard him. He focused back on the collection of dog-eared prints then stopped at a pile of familiar faces.

“Yes,” Dave said, "it's weird." Agreeing was the easiest way out of his latest faux pas.  He paused a moment and took a closer look at a group photo. “Pepper, can you put the Center for Missing Children's photos of Samantha, Lisa, and Rachael on the table?”
   
Pepper pulled them out from one of her files and laid them out in a row above where Dave had placed several old photographs.“I see we have some matches here, Dave.”


 
 


The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.


 ***

Milk Carton Murders 39

Time for Weekend Writing Warriors! This photo is my lake from my Milk Carton Murders World.
In my book it's called Spirit Lake, in reality it is Silver Lake by my house.
SETUP: We are leaving the scene where Investigator Pepper Black tells Dave about the clue found inside the stuffed dog that was in the coffin with six-year-old Samantha.We are back in the county sheriff's office where Dave is looking at files and photos pulled from Dave's attic from when his mother and father were foster parents to Samantha and other children. As always, italics is the "other voice" in Dave's head.


AND NOW THE SNIPPET:

This box of photographs held more promise, they were in the right time frame—even a few of himself as a kid.

What? No baby pictures of you, Davy? That’s weird, don’t you think? 


“It’s not weird,” Dave said, out loud. Dammit—now he really was talking to himself. The first thing on the list when this case was over was to see that shrink.

“I’m sorry, did you say that’s weird?” asked Pepper.


***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.


 ***

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Meet My Character Blog Tour


I was tagged by Teresa Cypher in the MEET MY CHARACTER BLOG TOUR. I know Teresa from the Weekend Writing Warriors blog hop. She is a talented writer and I look forward to reading her book when it releases in spring of 2015. If you want to see what her book is about and how she answered her questions, hop on over to Dreamers,Lovers, & Star Voyagers blog.

As for me, here are the seven questions and my answers:

1) What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person? 

My character is fictional, and purposely a very uninteresting name of Dave Robertson, a local reporter for the Lamont Weekly Times, a newspaper in a small rural town in western New York. But Dave is far from ordinary.

 

2) When and where is the story set?

Although Lamont is a real hamlet in the county where I live, my fictional place is a very active historic rural village. 

 

3) What should we know about him/her? 

Something happened to Dave when he was a child, events that he can’t remember which triggered a “voice” in his head. Dave grew to manhood thinking this was normal, “Doesn’t everyone talk to themselves once in a while?” It is not until three child size coffins slide out from the bank of Wiscoy Creek, revealing the 20+ year old murders of three girls that trigger his memory, and the voice becomes stronger.

 

4) What is the main conflict? What messes up his/her life? 

One of the murdered girls had lived at his house as a foster child. As bits of his memory returns, Dave suspects his dad. Investigator Pepper Black is keeping Dave close sensing he knows something about the murders. Dave struggles with everything coming to a head at once.

 

5) What is the personal goal of the character? 

His goal is to remember what happened 20 years ago, to rid the voice in his head and clear his father’s name--if he can.

 

6) Is there a working title for this novel, and can we read more about it? 

The novel is called The Milk Carton Murders. You can read 8 sentence excerpts every Sunday right her on my blog as part of the Weekend Writing Warriors. I also have a recap page of snippets that you can check out here.

 

7) When can we expect the book to be published? 

I’m aiming for the summer of 2015.

Here is the blurb:

 When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.

Now onto meeting the great authors who accepted my invitation to join along. Stop by and visit them when they post on August 4th!

Sharon Buchbinder - Obsession - Crime cartels with seething romance!
E. E. Giorgi - Chimeras - A hard-boiled mystery with a genetic twist.And a sneak peak at her new book!
ELR Jones - Contemporary, Interracial & Paranormal Romance.  (She also has a blog of author news.)
F. C. Etier -  Meet Claudia, the coolest female assassin ever.

Milk Carton Murders 38

Wiscoy Creek (Yes, it's a real place near where I live.)
SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old coffins washed out of the bank of the Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid who he knew as Sally, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. Last time Pepper tells Dave of the stuffed dog found in the coffin with Samantha. Turns out Dave had given it to her before she disappeared. Pepper explained last week a piece of Balsa wood was found inside the toy with a carved message from the girl. (I'm leaving out part of the convo as it has clues and to keep it to 8 sentences.) Dave is trying to keep the "other voice" he hears in his head at bay, as asks what Samantha wrote. Pepper leads us off...

AND NOW THE SNIPPET:

“On one side it said, ‘Sammy Briggs August 22, 1987’ and underneath it, ‘Remember me, September 28, 1987.’ ”

“The August date had to be the week of the fair,” Dave surmised, "but the September date is after she left us—way after.”

Pepper agreed. “I'm sure she guessed something was going to happen, but what she carved on the other side was even more unsettling."

Dave squelched the other voice in his head from coming to the forefront of his mind. “I almost don’t want to know, but go ahead.”

Pepper looked up at him. “It said—the milk man is evil.”

***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!

*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.


 ***

My blog may look different again when you stop next week. Some things with this one don't work right, like the side show. :(
It is canning and freezing time so I may not get to all of you on Sunday. I must take advantage of hubby being home to help. I shall be visiting blogs all week though. :)

Milk Carton Murders 37

My vision of Lamont, the town of The Milk Carton Murders
(Photo is really Bastrop, TX, although my book is set in western NY State.)



SETUP: The three girls whose twenty plus-year-old remains washed up in coffins at Wiscoy Creek have been identified as Lisa Appleton, Rachel McKenzie and Samantha Briggs. Samantha was a foster child at Dave's house when he was a kid who he knew as Sally, and it was the last place Dave seen her alive. Last time Pepper tells Dave of the stuffed dog found in the coffin with Samantha. Turns out Dave had given it to her before she disappeared. We pick up a little bit ahead in the same scene. Pepper speaks first.

And now the snippet:

“Samantha put something inside the stuffed dog at some point, between the back stitches—a piece of balsa wood. We figure it survived because it was surrounded by fiber fill, basically encased in plastic.”

“Balsa wood? That’s what my pine wood derby car was made out of.”

“And when did you make that?”

“It was pretty soon after she came to us—May or June, but why do that?"

Pepper looked him straight in the eye, “Because it was a soft wood to carve into I imagine. She wanted to leave us a message, Dave; for the person she hoped someday would find her.”

###

I wonder what it said? Don't you hate that?

***
The link to the other Weekend Writing Warriors is here. You're bound to find something to pique your interest.

The Sunday Snippet writer's on Facebook are here. Between the two there is something for everyone. Thank you for any comments you leave me. Much appreciated!
*** 
BLURB:
When three small coffins are unearthed near the Wiscoy Creek during a routine dredging operation, it’s the last thing DAVE ROBERTSON, of the Lamont Weekly Times, expected. Pinned to the skeleton’s clothing are pictures from milk cartons of missing girls.

Dave is stunned to find that one of the girls is Sally―a foster child his parents had cared for through the Friends of Foster Families (FFF) program. Cold case files reveal the girls disappeared over 20 years ago. Knowing his house was the last place he saw Sally alive, he can’t help but suspect his dad.

How can he write the biggest story of his career if his father turns out to be the killer? If the voice in his head would shut up and let him remember, he might figure it out before he loses his mind and his dad is charged with murder.

Full blurb and snippet recap here.
 

***   

Freedom To Read

Three winners will be chosen to receive an ebook 
(your choice of format MOBI or EPUB) of
Bread & Butter 
The Murders of Polly Frisch

A 19th century true crime by Cindy Amrhein (me) and Ellen Bachorski


In 1856, in the rural town of Alabama, NY one woman's family suffered from multiple unexplained deaths. The town folk grew suspicious of the now remarried Polly Frisch. An investigation commenced, bodies were exhumed, an affair—exposed. Polly would be arrested for the murders of her first husband and daughters. Her fourteen-year-old son would testify against her. If found guilty, the punishment for such a crime was the gallows. Would Polly be the first woman in Genesee County history to be hanged for murder? Bread & Butter is the true story of Polly Frisch who poisoned her family with arsenic and the five trials it took to convict her.


All you have to do is leave a comment below, the rest is optional for extra entries. Good luck!
Don't forget to hop around to he other blogs below to  enter other giveaways.



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Inspirational writing tools.

Now tell me, what writer doesn't still like a classic now and then?

So last week at a flee market I spotted a vintage 1930s (my guess) typewriter for $55. So this week we went back to get it. They also had a six speed Greco swing for $10. I bargained and got both for $60. Can't believe the manual was underneath the typewriter, copyright 1934-38, and it has a key. I can lock it like my iPad! HA ! I know yuz writers is jealous!

It is a small portable in beautiful condition. It still has the typewriter brush with it too. No bent keys as the, "Quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog," has proved. The ribbon even had a little life in it, but I shall have to check around for ribbons, which won't be hard. This is one gadget that has stood the test of time. I'm going to take it to my favorite spot at Silver Lake and write. I think I may have to cut my fingernails ...


Speaking of new gadgets, I'm trying to get the Amazon carousel thing to book to display books. I can see it when on my laptop but not on my iPad? Think it's an Apple not wanting to display Amazon things issue? I'm going to try it below and see if it works in a post. If you don't see it, I guess it will answer that question.